China’s Property Problems

Alarm bells are warning of a Chinese property bubble, but Beijing can avoid a crisis by allowing inflation to fix the problem.

May 21, 2014   |    By Scott Minerd, Global CIO

Global CIO Commentary by Scott Minerd

In the first four months of this year, housing starts in China fell by 25 percent from a year ago, the amount of homes sold fell by 8.6 percent, and home price appreciation has clearly slowed, adding to concerns of property sector weakness. While Chinese policymakers are curbing the growth of shadow banking, some highly leveraged developers have been unable to repay loans or start new projects because the availability of credit has tightened. Some fear this could lead to a crisis akin to the U.S. financial collapse of 2008. Real estate investment accounts for about 12.5 percent of China’s economic activity, making it vitally important to investors and Beijing. Still, a slowing property market can be managed.

The much-feared Chinese real estate meltdown seems highly unlikely.

ScottMinerd

Alarm bells warning of China’s coming real estate meltdown sound very similar to worries about Europe’s commercial real estate debts a few years ago. In 2010, there were huge concerns over the billions of euros of commercial real estate loans on the books of European banks. With many of those loans needing to be refinanced by 2012, some feared a terrible reckoning resulting from high loan-to-value ratios, loans being under water, and broken loan covenants. While there were some localized disturbances, these were largely contained and a full-blown European real estate crisis never materialized. Anyone who understood the European system could see that this was never likely to bring the banking system down and the same goes for China today.

Chinese real estate is problematic, but not catastrophic. Chinese loan-to-value ratios on residential real estate loans are in the 50-60 percent range -- much lower than typical leverage ratios in the United States, which are currently 78.3 percent. Prices are certainly high, but Chinese policymakers have been guiding housing price appreciation to zero over the past few years, and therefore, I do not see housing falling off a cliff.

A potential fix would be for Beijing to let inflation rise to 5-7 percent for three or four years and grow out of the problem. A Chinese slow-growth scenario where nominal GDP doubled over five years or so would eliminate the housing problem with little pain. Investors wondering if 5-7 percent inflation is acceptable should remember we have been there twice in the past decade and with China’s housing market an important pillar of its economy, we may be headed there again.

Chinese Banking Crisis Unlikely

Concerns of a Chinese housing market collapse have mounted recently, with home price appreciation moderating and new construction plunging. Any housing slowdown would weigh on consumer wealth gains and damage household balance sheets but would be unlikely to cause a full-blown banking crisis. Real estate lending is a much smaller portion of banking activity in China than in the United States, suggesting any negative impact from a housing slowdown would be manageable.

EXPOSURE TO CHINESE HOUSING MARKET DOWNTURN

EXPOSURE TO CHINESE HOUSING MARKET DOWNTURN

Source: Haver, CEIC, BIS, Guggenheim Investments. Data as of 4Q2013 for household debt and as of 1Q2014 for real estate loans.

Economic Data Releases

U.S. Housing Starts Show First Signs of Housing Rebound

Euro Zone Consumer Confidence Makes New High, Japanese Exports Rebound

 
Important Notices and Disclosures

This article is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be considered as investing advice or a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. This article contains opinions of the author but not necessarily those of Guggenheim Partners or its subsidiaries. The author’s opinions are subject to change without notice. Forward looking statements, estimates, and certain information contained herein are based upon proprietary and non-proprietary research and other sources. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but are not assured as to accuracy. No part of this article may be reproduced in any form, or referred to in any other publication, without express written permission of Guggenheim Partners, LLC. ©2014, Guggenheim Partners. Past performance is not indicative of future results. There is neither representation nor warranty as to the current accuracy of, nor liability for, decisions based on such information.


FEATURED PERSPECTIVES

Opportunities in Credit Amid Challenging Conditions - Featured Perspectives
November 06, 2020

Opportunities in Credit Amid Challenging Conditions

Credit spreads still have room to tighten, but default risk remains elevated in certain sectors.

In the Eye of the Storm - Featured Perspectives
October 22, 2020

In the Eye of the Storm

The relative calm we feel in the markets right now isn’t the end of the storm, it is just the eye.

China Matters More Than Ever - Featured Perspectives
July 29, 2020

China Matters More Than Ever

Cooperation and understanding between China and United States is vital as global economic and environmental challenges mount.


VIDEO

Fixed-Income Outlook 

Third Quarter 2020 Outlook

Brian Smedley, Head of Macroeconomic and Investment Research, and Portfolio Manager Steve Brown share their outlook for the third quarter 2020.

The Long Road to Recovery 

The Long Road to Recovery

Scott Minerd, Chairman of Investments and Global CIO, discussed his outlook for markets and the economy with CNBC’s Brian Sullivan during the Milken Institute 2020 Global Conference.







© 2020 Guggenheim Partners, LLC. All rights reserved. Guggenheim, Guggenheim Partners and Innovative Solutions. Enduring Values. are registered trademarks of Guggenheim Capital, LLC.